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Final Thoughts from The National Postal Forum

Kurt Ruppel

It feels like we just arrived here in San Francisco for the National Postal Forum, but it’s already time to say our goodbyes and look forward to next year. Before we get on a plane back to the cold and snow in Minnesota, there was one final keynote presentation worth sharing. Ellis Burgoyne, CIO and EVP, delivered “Technology and What It Means to be a Connected Consumer” to another full room this morning, marking the third straight day with a morning address from Postal Service executives.

Thoughts from Ellis Burgoyne’s Keynote Presentation

The impact of technology and data on this year’s Postal Forum was undeniable. Not only did my colleague Bob Rosser and I deliver our own presentation on Full-Service Intelligent Mail, Ellis Burgoyne outlined how the USPS is adopting it, along with other technology throughout its operations, to provide the tools needed to manage mail from “first mile” to “last mile” at the pace of life today.

The idea of “enormous data” will have an immediate impact on the mailing community. In fact, the Postal Service stores roughly 23 petabytes (PB) of data and has geo-fenced all 151 million address points across the country in anticipation of providing richer data that confirms the delivery timing of all types of mail. Jim Cochrane, VP Product Information, talked about making “last mile” delivery information rich and noted that it’s his goal to have the industry on board with this movement because the vision of what we can do in the future is so compelling.

Of course, with data and technology come security and privacy concerns. There was discussion of how the Postal Inspection Service has evolved from protecting mail on stagecoaches to providing information security for the “enormous data” managed by the USPS. These concerns will be something to watch as data and technology initiatives continue to develop.

Final Thoughts

The 2013 National Postal Forum was upbeat as it looked toward the future of mail and the USPS – both of which are still relevant to a digitally connected society. Although attendance was slightly smaller than previous years, sessions were full and energy was high. It’s clear that people are excited about moving mail into the future.

We always enjoy the opportunity to have substantive discussions with leaders from all parts of the Postal Service as we look for more and better ways to do business together. Those discussions centered around the impact of technology and data on the present and future state of the mailing community. More specifically:

  1. How Full-Service Intelligent Mail data makes mail more valuable and provides tools for both mailers and consumers to track and manage their mail
  2. How physical mail is the springboard for digital connections
  3. How technology is touching all phases of mail from induction, through processing, to delivery

That’s all from San Francisco. We’re already counting down the days until next year, but until then, feel free to subscribe to SpeakingDIRECT for the latest direct marketing trends, industry news and postal updates. We always enjoy continuing the conversation.

P.S. We would like to extend special thanks to our friends at King Solutions and Canon for their hospitality and a great sampling of San Francisco cuisine. Our trip west wouldn’t have been complete without great food and even better company.

link https://www.iwco.com/blog/2013/03/20/national-postal-forum-final-thoughts/
Kurt Ruppel

Author

Kurt Ruppel

Director Postal Policy and Marketing Communications and graduate of Utah State University. Bringing the “all of us know more than any of us” business philosophy to IWCO Direct for more than 30 years (oy!). Three-time IWCO Direct President’s Award winner, Vice Chairman of the EMA Board of Directors, bicycling enthusiast, and Ohio State Buckeye Football fan.

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